Peruvian, Flemish or Mixed Cajon


Features:

  • Materials: the drawer is made of cedar wood, and can also be in multilaminate. Rubber feet. Solid wood are better in terms of sound quality and materials.
  • Weight: 3 kg
  • Front: 30 cm
  • Height: 50 cm
  • Depth: 25 cm
  • Finish: Varnish
  • Construction time: 15 days
  • STOCK: Yes
  • Cover: does not include, refer
  • Warranty: 6 months
  • Maintenance or Post-Sales Support: no, consult
  • Optional: Flamenco cajon version, which carries inside guitar strings (6th.) and the mixed one that also incorporates double cover to have two in one, Peruvian and flamenco in the same drawer. Consult.

IMPORTANT: THE SHIPPING COST MUST BE ADDED TO THE PRICE OF THE INSTRUMENT. SHIPMENTS OUTSIDE THE COUNTRY OF ORIGIN (ARGENTINA) ARE MADE WITH SERVICES SUCH AS DHL.

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Description

Peruvian Cajon

Percussion Idophone
Resonating Bodies, from Cuba, Peru, America; Spain, Europe; African origin


History of the Peruvian Cajon

It is instrument has a difficult and curious origin. The Peruvian drawer created by African slaves dates back to 1900 although, some researchers claim that this instrument already existed in the year 1850.

In this regard, Manuel Atanasio Fuentes in his book “Lima: Historical, Descriptive, Statistical and Customs Notes” states that at that time there was a kind of drum regularly made of drawer, boxes and boards, the same that had one of its sides unclaved to make the drawer blow more sound. This instrument could be executed with your hands or two pieces of cane.

African slaves brought into the new world against their will, perhaps found some relief by grouping songs of their African land. In Africa talking about music is talking about percussion, it is likely that locked in boats or galleons for months, they had to look for surfaces or objects around them to accompany their songs. And so came, by the thousands to Peruvian lands, turned into black slaves of the Spanish yoke.

Probably in the vicinity of sugarcane plantations, or cotton, after working days, the brunettes gathered to rest and talk, and the music that evoked their origins and relieved their present life. And, sitting in the shade of a tree on some yard or solar, they sang songs and some perished the chairs, and others, the drawers used to transport objects or fruits.

Source: Instrumundo


About the luthier

Musician, teacher and luthier, workshop coordinator.


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